teeth infections

How Different Types of Water Affect Teeth

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With a daily abundance of beverage options at your fingertips, are you aware of how your drink choices affect your overall health? Between the whopping amount of calories and added sugar in many sodas, sports drinks, and even some fruit juices, most of us know that water is the best choice for our oral health and overall health. Here, we’ll discuss the differences between three types of water: tap water, bottled water, and sparkling water which causes teeth infections.

Tap Water

When you turn on the faucet in your kitchen or bathroom, you’re using tap water. We wash our hands with it, we brush our teeth using it, and we often don’t think twice about it. This type of water must meet the standards of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In many parts of the country, this includes making sure it contains enough fluoride, which is often naturally occurring in the water supply (as is the case in Richmond, Texas), but fluoride is often added to a greater amount to offer more protection against tooth decay. Historically, the presence of fluoride in a community’s tap water has significantly reduced the occurrence of tooth decay. If you are using a filter with your tap faucet, you may be filtering out some of the beneficial fluoride, but usually it’s only in trace amounts so there’s no need to worry about teeth infections.

Bottled Water

In addition to being more expensive and potentially harmful to the environment, a standout characteristic of bottled water is that many brands do not include added fluoride. You and your family are missing out on some of the oral health benefits of fluoride if you get your water intake exclusively from non-fluoridated bottled water. So be sure you are brushing your teeth with a fluoridated toothpaste and rinsing occasionally with a mouthwash that contains fluoride.

Sparkling Water

Although it unfortunately doesn’t contain fluoride, sipping sparkling water is a simple way to add a little excitement to your water intake with its satisfying little bit of fizz. Carbonation, the source of that fun fizz, technically changes the pH of water and leads to a more acidic drink, but plain sparkling water has thus far proved to erode teeth enamel about the same as regular water, its non-carbonated, un-sparkly cousin. However, a word of caution: if your sparkling water is flavored with citrus or sugar, beware! Citrus-flavored sparkling water is actually much more acidic than plain sparkling water and poses a greater risk of enamel erosion. And if your sparkling water contains sugar, it’s no longer really just sparkling water; it’s a sweetened beverage that makes you more susceptible to tooth decay.

Our Team Is Here to Help!

Still have questions about how water affects teeth infections? Ask anyone on our friendly and knowledgeable team. We love educating our patients about their oral health. Moreover, if it has been more than six months since you last had a dental checkup and cleaning, contact us to set up your next appointment.

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