Oral Hygiene

Yellow Teeth
Why Teeth Turn Yellow And Is It Normal To Have Yellow Teeth?
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Is it bad to have yellow teeth?

As you age, your teeth can start yellowing as a natural part of the aging process. Why does this happen? This occurs over time due to everyday wear and tear on your teeth as the strong white protective coating on teeth (enamel) begins to fade. However if they are yellow due to bad dental hygiene, then yes, that’s definitely bad. There are cases where teeth are naturally yellow. This usually is a symptom with people who have high translucent enamel, they tend to have yellow shade because the dentin underneath shows through.

 

Does drinking certain fluids and smoking turn teeth yellow?

Fluids such as coffee, soda, and wine, which are high in tannins, can also cause yellow teeth. Smoking is another issue that can change your teeth color.  This is due to the nicotine and tar which seeps into the tooth’s enamel through tiny pores, leaving the teeth discolored. There are other substances that can get into the enamel of your teeth and can cause long-term discoloration.

 

Are yellow teeth unhealthy?

Some people are born with teeth that are more yellowish because of the thinner layer of their tooth enamel. The enamel if thinner then the naturally yellow color of your dentin will show and therefore be more prevalent. While certain foods and drinks can stain teeth it doesn’t mean the teeth are unhealthy. Some people have naturally white teeth but can still have gum infections or cavities. Similarly, individuals can have healthy teeth which are off-white, yellowish or even brownish in color.

 

Is it possible to stop my teeth from being yellow?

Following good dental hygiene practices can help prevent teeth from turning yellow. As any dentist will tell you, it is important to brush teeth at least twice a day, to floss regularly to remove plaque, and rinse with antiseptic mouthwash at least once a day to kill bacteria which causes plaque. It might be useful to deploy whitening toothpaste to remove surface stains to prevent yellowing.

Dental Emergency If Teeth Got Broken
What is considered a dental emergency?
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What is considered a dental emergency?

If you’re experiencing pain, which includes bleeding or need treatment in order to save a tooth, these can be considered a dental emergency. In this case, please call us at Highline Dental (832- 220-9324) right away. And if you have severe swollen gums or jaw pain this can be a sign of infection, and is usually accompanied by a bad taste in your mouth, high temperatures, or fever. It may also be difficult to swallow food, drink fluids or even breathe. Please call our Highline Dental office if you suffer from any of the below symptoms so we may assist you.

 

What are the Signs of dental emergency situations?

  • Loose teeth & excessively bleeding gums
  • Prolonged severe toothache
  • Long headaches and excessive fatigue
  • Swelling in the jaw caused by abscess infection

 

After Hours Emergency Dentist – How Highline Dentistry Can Help

While most dental offices, including Highline Dental, are not open 24 hours, we do our best to assist you with dental emergencies. Don’t suffer in pain when you have injury causing excessive bleeding or accidents with loose or fractured tooth. Simply come see us for same day appointments or do a search for “dental emergency near me” if looking for an after hours, emergency dentist.

 

Can I go to Hospital Emergency Room or Urgent Care Centers for dental emergencies?

Hospital rooms generally do not have the proper facilities or training to deal with standard dental care. Emergency departments or urgent care centers may or may not have dentists on 24 hour call. However, staff at these centers are trained to stabilize the patient who may be suffering from fractured, broken or dislodged teeth and severe pain. Do a search for dental emergency near me and call to confirm your condition and what care they are able to provide you.

Teeth Infections
How Different Types of Water Affect Teeth
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With a daily abundance of beverage options at your fingertips, are you aware of how your drink choices affect your overall health? Between the whopping amount of calories and added sugar in many sodas, sports drinks, and even some fruit juices, most of us know that water is the best choice for our oral health and overall health. Here, we’ll discuss the differences between three types of water: tap water, bottled water, and sparkling water which causes teeth infections.

Tap Water

When you turn on the faucet in your kitchen or bathroom, you’re using tap water. We wash our hands with it, we brush our teeth using it, and we often don’t think twice about it. This type of water must meet the standards of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In many parts of the country, this includes making sure it contains enough fluoride, which is often naturally occurring in the water supply (as is the case in Richmond, Texas), but fluoride is often added to a greater amount to offer more protection against tooth decay. Historically, the presence of fluoride in a community’s tap water has significantly reduced the occurrence of tooth decay. If you are using a filter with your tap faucet, you may be filtering out some of the beneficial fluoride, but usually it’s only in trace amounts so there’s no need to worry about teeth infections.

Bottled Water

In addition to being more expensive and potentially harmful to the environment, a standout characteristic of bottled water is that many brands do not include added fluoride. You and your family are missing out on some of the oral health benefits of fluoride if you get your water intake exclusively from non-fluoridated bottled water. So be sure you are brushing your teeth with a fluoridated toothpaste and rinsing occasionally with a mouthwash that contains fluoride.

Sparkling Water

Although it unfortunately doesn’t contain fluoride, sipping sparkling water is a simple way to add a little excitement to your water intake with its satisfying little bit of fizz. Carbonation, the source of that fun fizz, technically changes the pH of water and leads to a more acidic drink, but plain sparkling water has thus far proved to erode teeth enamel about the same as regular water, its non-carbonated, un-sparkly cousin. However, a word of caution: if your sparkling water is flavored with citrus or sugar, beware! Citrus-flavored sparkling water is actually much more acidic than plain sparkling water and poses a greater risk of enamel erosion. And if your sparkling water contains sugar, it’s no longer really just sparkling water; it’s a sweetened beverage that makes you more susceptible to tooth decay.

Our Team Is Here to Help!

Still have questions about how water affects teeth infections? Ask anyone on our friendly and knowledgeable team. We love educating our patients about their oral health. Moreover, if it has been more than six months since you last had a dental checkup and cleaning, contact us to set up your next appointment.

health effect
How Oral Health Affects Overall Health
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Why are dentists always making such a stink about good oral health habits? If you’re not brushing twice a day for two minutes each time, flossing once a day, and seeing us for regular checkups every six months, you could be putting more than just your mouth at risk. Here’s something you might not know—your dental health affects your overall health. Continue reading our blog post to discover how they correlate!

Unhealthy Mouths Make for Unhappy Frowns

If you’re not keeping your teeth and gums healthy, you could be exposing yourself to harmful bacteria that can make you sick. Plaque and tartar accumulate if you don’t brush your teeth daily at home and regularly receive professional dental cleanings. They then produce acid that wears down at the hard casing around your teeth (called enamel) and makes you susceptible to tooth sensitivity, tooth decay, tooth discoloration, and tooth infection. Poor oral care encourages bacteria to grow, leading to serious health issues such as gum disease.

Gingivitis, Periodontitis & Advanced Periodontitis

Gum disease is linked to diabetes, heart disease, acne, and pneumonia. If you’re experiencing any of the following symptoms, you could have gum disease and should contact us for treatment:

  • Receding, tender, red, bleeding, or swollen gums
  • Pockets between your gums and teeth
  • One loose tooth or multiple loose teeth
  • Halitosis (also known as bad breath)

Tips for a Healthy Smile

While advanced gum disease requires specialized treatment, there are a few things you should always be doing at home to promote healthy gums and strong teeth, regardless of their current condition. Be sure to follow these tips:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time
  • Floss every day
  • Rinse and gargle with an alcohol-free mouthwash
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Replace your toothbrush every three months
  • Visit Highline Dental every six months for cleanings and checkups

Importance of Preventive Care

Always remember that it’s a lot easier to prevent dental issues than it is to cure them! Keeping your teeth and gumline as free of plaque, tartar, and decay as possible is your best bet for keeping your mouth and the rest of your body strong and healthy. To schedule your next cleaning and checkup at our Richmond dental office, contact us today!